1 Comment

Brainwave Training – Positive Feedback

A recent article on Kurzweil.net has discussed how researchers from the University of Western Ontario and the Lawson Health Research Institute have found that…

functional changes within a key brain network occur directly after a 30-minute session of noninvasive, neurofeedback training.1

The article explains how…

Dysfunction of this cognitive-control network has previously been implicated in a range of brain disorders including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder.1

and goes on to explain that…

During neurofeedback, users learn to control their own brain activity with the help of a brain-sensing device. In the simplest case, this consists of a computer that records brainwaves through surface sensors on the scalp, known as an EEG (electroencephalogram).1

The implication of this being that…

Amazingly, this would imply that the brain’s function may be entrained in a direction that is more attentive and quiet. In other words, our findings speak for the exquisite functional plasticity of the adult brain, whose past activity of little more than 30 minutes ago can condition its future state of processing. This has already been hinted at in meditation research, but we arrived at a direct and explicit demonstration by harnessing a brain-computer interface.”1

You can read the full article here

Advertisements

One comment on “Brainwave Training – Positive Feedback

  1. I came here thinking something else, but this interested me regardless. Inspiring stuff!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: